New Orleans has so much to offer – history, culture, music, great food, etc., but most visitors don’t stray too far from Bourbon Street and the French Quarter. Here are some ideas for seeing more of the fabulous city.

See our list of the 49 best things to do in New Orleans here.

1. Frenchman Street Corridor

Frenchman Street

A less-touristy alternative to the French Quarter. This is where the locals go to meet for drinks and hear some of the best jazz on earth. Clubs, music and street musicians are everywhere. Open very late. Home to clubs such as The Spotted Cat Music Club, Snug Harbor, d.b.a., and Three Muses. (photo by Infrogmation of New Orleans)

2. Mr. B’s Bistro

Mr. B's Bistro

This Creole bistro serves gourmet, contemporary cuisine and was named “Best Business Lunch” by Food and Wine. A visit offers a great introduction to Cajun cooking, and it’s authentic – Mr. B’s Bistro is owned and managed by Cindy Brennan, a member of the legendary New Orleans’ Brennan Family. Get the Gumbo Ya Ya with Chicken and Andouille Sausage or the Mr. B’S Barbecued Shrimp with Peppery Butter Sauce and French Bread for dipping. http://www.mrbsbistro.com (photo by Southern Foodways Alliance)

3. Laura Plantation

Laura Plantation

Laura Plantation is historic sugar plantation that was originally built in 1805 and has been restored. The historic plantation sits on the west bank of the Mississippi River near Vacherie, LA. Guided tours offer a glimpse into Creole plantation history. www.lauraplantation.com (photo by Phil Whitehouse)

4. St. James Cheese Company

St. James Cheese Company

This bustling cheesemonger shop sells gourmet cheeses from far and near and is a perfect destination for enjoying a leisurely gourmet salad or sandwich on the patio, or for picking up a culinary souvenir to take back home. Located in the Uptown neighborhood just south of St. Charles Avenue. Check their web site for special tastings. www.stjamescheese.com (photo by Andrea Wright)

5. Free Tours by Foot

Free Tours by Foot

The tours are free, but the guides make money by earning tips. Three walking tours from which to choose: French Quarter, Ghost Tour, Garden District and Lafayette Cemetery Tour, plus one bike tour. This is a top notch tour and a great way to get to know New Orleans. The guides are knowledgeable and generally witty. www.freetoursbyfoot.com (photo by Heather Elias)

6. New Orleans School of Cooking

New Orleans School of Cooking

Learn how to cook Cajun and Creole cuisine under the guidance of expert chefs – Jambalaya, Gumbo, Corn Crab Bisque, Crawfish Etouffee, Bananas Foster, Pralines. Learn about local history and customs. The best part: sitting down to enjoy your meal at the end. www.neworleansschoolofcooking.com (photo by Heather Elias)

7. Dante’s Kitchen

Dante's Kitchen

Enjoy low-key gourmet cuisine cooked up by Chef Eman Loubier in a rambling old house. The specialty is the Maple Glazed Chicken Roasted Under a Brick, served with Potato and Bacon Hash Cake and topped with a Fried Egg. For brunch, get the Shrimp and Grits with a Bloody Mary. Local produce plays a starring role, and most everything is housemade. www.danteskitchen.com (photo by Infrogmation of New Orleans)

8. Angelo Brocato Ice Cream and Confectionery

Angelo Brocato Ice Cream and Confectionery

A New Orleans tradition since way back in 1905. Super-good gelato, lemon ice, spumoni, cannoli, biscotti, Italian cookies, coffee. Take the Canal St. streetcar to City Park/Museum and get off at Bienville. www.angelobrocatoicecream.com (photo by Infrogmation of New Orleans)

9. The Cocktail Tour

The Cocktail Tour

In a city full of booze and history, why not enjoy both simultaneously? Two hour walking tour includes plenty of history and stories from guide and culinary historian Elizabeth Pearce, plus a Sazerac, a Hurricane, St. Charles Hotel Punch, Praline liqueur and bottled water. www.thecocktailtour.com (photo by Gary J. Wood)

10. Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar

Lafitte's Blacksmith Shop Bar

It’s located in the oldest building in the Quarter – dating back to the 1770’s, and it’s the oldest bar in the country. It was once the outpost of privateer brothers Jean and Pierre Lafitte. Tennessee Williams drank here. It’s dank and candle-lit. It’s got drinks and live music. www.lafittesblacksmithshop.com (photo by treewoman8)

11. Port of Call

Port of Call

Arguably the best burger in town – big and sloppy half-pounders served with a loaded baked potato. The steaks are also good. The local drink is the Monsoon – a super-strong rum and fruit juice drink. Go-cups are available if you cannot finish it. The place can get crowded, and there may be a wait, but that’s why you order a monsoon. www.portofcallnola.com (photo by Ann Larie Valentine)

12. Cajun Encounters

Cajun Encounters

Take a break from the French Quarter – tour the Honey Island Swamp in a boat and see alligators, raccoons, owls, wild boars, nutria, snakes, turtles, bald eagles, black bears, and many birds, as well as a real Cajun village. The funny Cajun guides will keep you from getting bit by an alligator – just like you’d want. www.cajunencounters.com (photo by Madeleine Deaton)

13. Dick and Jenny’s

Dick and Jenny's

In a small cottage in the Uptown district near Tipitina’s, Dick and Jenny Benz prepare seasonal, flavorful, and southern fare in a casual setting. Fried Green Tomatoes and Jumbo Lump Crab Remoulade. Abita Braised Beef Short Ribs Over Goat Cheese-Thyme Grits with Brown Butter Sautéed Brussels Sprouts and Spiced Bourbon Demi-Glace. Call same day after 3:30 to make reservations. dickandjennys.com (photo by shu)

14. Rock ‘n’ Bowl

Rock 'n' Bowl

What’s better than bowling, drinking beer, and listening to live music in between turns? Maybe just drinking beer and eating a gourmet burger at the same time. The music at Rock’n’Bowl is seriously good local music. There’s a dance floor in front of the stage. So much to do – all in one place. Go here. www.rocknbowl.com (photo by fw_gadget)

15. Mother-In-Law Lounge

Mother-In-Law Lounge

Ernie K-Doe is famous for his No. 1 hit from the early ‘60s, “Mother-in-Law.” In 1994, he opened his namesake bar so that older, legendary New Orleans musicians would have a place to perform. Good times at the bar were balanced with bad times: Ernie die in 2001, his wife, Antoinette, ran the bar until she died in 2009, then Antoinette’s daughter, Betty Fox, ran the bar until it had to shut down in 2011. In the midst of all of the turnover, Katrina flooded the bar. Luckily, the bar was reopened in 2014 by local jazz trumpeter Kermit Ruffins. The music’s great, there’s food and drink, and the place has character. www.k-doe.com (photo by Infrogmation of New Orleans)

16. New Orleans Pharmacy Museum

New Orleans Pharmacy Museum

This is a small, often overlooked museum in the French Quarter. It’s on site of the first licensed apothecary shop in the US. Inside, visitors will find exhibits of old medicines, folk remedies, voodoo potions, an old soda fountain, surgical utensils. Learn about bloodletting and leeches. It’s good, fun history. Take a self-guided tour for $5. www.pharmacymuseum.org (photo by Ryan Lackey)

17. Coquette

Coquette

This slightly-still-under-the-radar, upscale NOLA restaurant serves locally-sourced modern Louisiana cuisine, and it’s some of the best food New Orleans has to offer. The restaurant is tucked into the corner of a historic building in the Garden District and filled with brick walls, dark woods, and tile floors. Three-course lunch specials. Soft-Shell Crab with Anson Mills Grits, Sweet Corn, Parmesan. There’s also an excellent and extensive drink menu at the long wooden bar. The Mule – House-Infused Peppermint Vodka, Yellow Chartreuse, Lemon, Ginger Beer. coquettenola.com (photo by angela n.)

18. Old New Orleans Rum Distillery

Old New Orleans Rum Distillery

All that rum everybody drink in the French Quarter has to come from somewhere – why not make it in New Orleans? A distillery founded by artists and musicians has managed to win major awards in competitions across the world. Take the tour and taste the rum. Fun and delicious way to spend an hour or so. oldneworleansrum.com (photo by kerinin)

19. Degas House

Degas House

French Impressionist Edgar Degas spent several months in New Orleans between 1872 and 1873 and stayed in this historic house. There are two well-designed tours or the home: Breakfast and a Tour, and Bottles and Brushes (have a drink and try your hand at painting like Degas). The home is also a bed and breakfast. www.degashouse.com (photo by Infrogmation of New Orleans)

20. Canal Street/Algiers Ferry

Canal Street Algiers Ferry

This free, 5-minute ferry leaves from Canal Street every 30 minutes and heads to Algiers across the Mississippi. Algiers is quiet – walk over to the Old Point Inn or the Crown and Anchor English Pub and have a drink and some food. The trip offers a great skyline view of New Orleans. nolaferries.com (photo by Reading Tom)

21. Camellia Grill

Camellia Grill

A NOLA institution serving burgers in a classy diner setting, as in white-jacketed waiters and white linen. Loud and lively and fun. Fluffy, Cheesy Omelets, Pecan Waffles, Chili-Cheese Fries, Chocolate Pecan Pie. (photo by K. Kendall)

Featured photo by Ben. All photos CC-BY-2.0.

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